4 Hugues Ross Writes a Devlog: Getting Organized - 6 - Tick Tock
Hugues Ross

7/16/17

Getting Organized - 6 - Tick Tock

Hello again, dear readers. Once again, it's time to make my life a little more productive. In my previous post, I grappled with my computer a little bit in order to bring my to-do list up every morning. This month, I'm going to work on my time management a little.

When I mentioned that I wanted a timer back in May, I said that I wanted "I'd like something that fits with everything else". I'm not entirely sure how many purely hypothetical beers I drank before writing that thought, but looking back it sounds more like the mutterings of the local town loony than anything important. I assure you, however, that this strange little collection of words will make sense if you read the following two paragraphs. So, y'know, you can just skip them if you're up for a challenge.

So, if you've been reading these posts religiously then you'll know that I use Awesome to manage my desktop. This gives me lots of control and customization options, but also makes using "traditional" desktop apps cumbersome at times. In this case, a quick Google search will find you endless pages of linux timer apps, coming in exactly two flavors:
  1. Pretty (useless) dialog windows that take up half your screen with fancy Large Text
  2. Icons in your system tray
Option 1 is unappealing in general, but also breaks with my window-management preferences. I could let one of these apps ignore Awesome's tiling rules, but then it would also block me from interacting with whatever's underneath it. Oh, and it's definitely not getting its own special desktop, so that's out. Option 2 would work nicely...if I had a system tray. I could add one and watch it fill with useless incongruous icons, or I could not do that and sleep well at night. But, there's another solution. Let's take a look at my bar for a moment:
Pretty much all of those nice little UI bits are custom. So, I can make my own "Option 2" that fits with the visual style of my desktop and does exactly what I want.

If you're still following along with my little scheme to make a timer but you're not sure it's quick or feasible, then I have some good news: It's done. I secretly went and did it this morning. Normally, I write and code together, but I just wasn't in the mood for 6 AM blogging. What was in the mood for was Runescape (???), and I didn't want to miss any deadlines in the process. I suppose you could say I was motivated by laziness, but I'm not about to complain!

The Implementation

The result of my mad morning keyboard mashing was just under 100 lines of Lua code. Most of that is UI boilerplate, but there's about 40 lines of actual logic in there that might interest someone, so let's give that a look:
   52 local timer = gears.timer {
   53     timeout   = 1,
   54     autostart = false,
   55     callback  = function()
   56         seconds_left = seconds_left - 1
   57         if seconds_left == 0 then
   58             awful.spawn({"mplayer", "/home/df458/assets/se/Notify01.wav"});
   59 
   60             local message = string.format("Your timer of %02d:%02d has ended", math.floor(seconds_total/3600), math.floor(seconds_total%3600/60))
   61             if seconds_total < 3600 then
   62                 message = string.format("Your timer of %02d:%02d has ended", math.floor(seconds_total/60), seconds_total%60)
   63             end
   64             naughty.notify {
   65                 title = "Time's up!",
   66                 text = message,
   67                 timeout = 300
   68             }
   69         elseif seconds_left < 0 then
   70             widget:set_visible(false)
   71             timer:stop()
   72         end
   73         progress:set_value(1 - (seconds_left / seconds_total))
   74         if seconds_left < 3600 then
   75             label:set_markup(string.format("%02d:%02d", math.floor(seconds_left/60), seconds_left%60))
   76         else
   77             label:set_markup(string.format("%02d:%02d", math.floor(seconds_left/3600), math.floor(seconds_left%3600/60)))
   78         end
   79     end
   80 }
   81 
   82 function activate_timer(seconds)
   83     seconds_left = seconds
   84     seconds_total = seconds
   85     widget:set_visible(true)
   86     progress:set_value(0)
   87     if seconds_left < 3600 then
   88         label:set_markup(string.format("%02d:%02d", math.floor(seconds_left/60), seconds_left%60))
   89     else
   90         label:set_markup(string.format("%02d:%02d", math.floor(seconds_left/3600), math.floor(seconds_left%3600/60)))
   91     end
   92     timer:start()
   93 end
As you can see, this little code block could probably use some cleaning. With that said, it works pretty well and demonstrates just how easy it is to make a timer. All I really do is set two numbers to how many seconds I want to wait, then subtract one from the 1st number every second. The second number isn't even necessary at all, but I use it to add a progress indicator. Beyond that, the rest is just making a nice text representation that switches between hour:minute to minute:second as necessary. When the timer's running, my little info are looks like this:
It's simple, sure, but it works quite well! Next time, I'll be wrapping up this series with some final touches to task management.
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